Study Reveals Corals’ Influence On Reef Microbes

As they grow, corals are bathed in a sea of marine microbes, such as bacteria, algae, and viruses. While these extremely abundant and tiny microorganisms influence coral communities in a variety of ways, a new study by researchers at WHOI, BIOS and UCSB reveals that corals also have an impact on the microbes in waters surrounding them.

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Billions Committed at Our Oceans Conference

Participants in the third Our Ocean conference, held September 15-16 in Washington, D.C., announced over 136 new initiatives on marine conservation and protection valued at more than $5.24 billion, as well as new commitments on the protection of almost four million square kilometers (over 1.5 million square miles) of the ocean.

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Ocean circulation implicated in past abrupt climate changes

There was a period during the last ice age when temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere went on a rollercoaster ride, plummeting and then rising again every 1,500 years or so. Those abrupt climate changes wreaked havoc on ecosystems, but their cause has been something of a mystery. New evidence shows for the first time that the ocean's overturning circulation slowed during every one of those temperature plunges -- at times almost stopping.

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NASA to map coral reefs from the air to show impact of climate change

Coral reefs have almost always been studied up close, by scientists in the water looking at small portions of larger reefs to gather data and knowledge about the larger ecosystems. But Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is taking a step back and getting a wider view, from about 23,000 ft above. Read more at TheGuardian.com

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New NASA Instrument Brings Coasts and Coral into Focus

The new Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM), created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is an airborne instrument designed to observe hard-to-see coastal water phenomena. In NASA's upcoming Coral Reef Airborne Laboratory (CORAL) field experiment, PRISM will observe entire reef ecosystems in more of the world's reef area - hundreds of times more -- than has ever been observed before.

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NASA takes 23,000-foot view of the world’s coral reefs

Coral reefs have almost always been studied up close, by scientists in the water looking at small portions of larger reefs to gather data and knowledge about the larger ecosystems. But NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is taking a step back and getting a wider view, from about 23,000 feet above.

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Media Invited Behind the Scenes of NASA Coral Reef Study in Hawaii

NASA's new Coral Reef Airborne Laboratory (CORAL), a three-year field study of Earth’s valuable coral reef ecosystems, is mounting an operations readiness test in Kane‘ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, in early June. Media are invited to meet the scientists, learn about the mission and see CORAL research equipment on June 9, from noon to 4 p.m. HST at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) on Moku o Loʻe (Coconut) Island in Kane‘ohe Bay.

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Monster hurricanes reached U.S. during prehistoric periods of ocean warming

New research on coastal sediments, funded in part by BIOS’s Risk Prediction Initiative, shows that prehistoric hurricanes along the northern East Coast of the United States were likely more frequent and intense than those that have hit within recorded history.

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As Bermuda braces for Gonzalo, underwater glider studies hurricane impact

An oceanographer is deploying an undersea glider to take measurements during the Category 3 storm, which is expected to hit Bermuda. Hopefully, the rare underwater perspective will yield insights that can be used to develop forecasting models.

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Photos: Groundswell Lionfish Tournament

The 2014 Groundswell Lionfish Tournament was held today [July 19] with the weigh-in taking place at BIOS at 3pm, after members of the public were invited to help eradicate the invasive pest by joining in by “Eating ‘Em to Beat ‘Em.”

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James Newton Butler

With the death on October 22, 2012, of James Newton Butler, Harvard and science witnessed the passing of an environmental pioneer. Jim is remembered in Cambridge for his humor, curiosity, and kindness as well as for his scientific achievements. Yet his Harvard colleagues were hardly aware that for decades he brought the same gifts to important biological research in Bermuda.

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Lionfish Control Plan completed

I rise today to inform this Honourable House that a Control Plan for the invasive lionfish has been completed.  The Plan was developed in a collaborative effort between Government, NGOs, and concerned citizens through a group known as the Lionfish Taskforce.

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BIOS Time Series Helps Scientists Confirm Ocean Acidification

In a unique collaboration researchers from around the globe have studied data from seven time-series and found that despite the varying geographic locations, each of the time-series sites exhibited similar changes in ocean chemistry due to anthropogenic CO2, confirming what many scientists have believed for years: ocean acidification is indeed changing ocean chemistry.

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Looking to the Future: Careers in Ocean Science

While majors in medicine, computers and information management, and biotechnology remain popular, there are a variety of majors in ocean science that can provide Bermudian students with unique opportunities to explore the world and contribute to the global understanding of how the ocean influences climate change, the world economy, and our daily lives.

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BIOS Bids Farewell to Dr. John Steele

It is with a heavy heart, but fond memories, that the BIOS community says goodbye to Dr. John Steele, a long-time supporter of BIOS and a pioneer in the field of marine ecosystems modeling.

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