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	Close up of a coral sitting inside an incubation chamber of the “Coral Hotel” deployed in the Red Sea. Constructed by TLZ at GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research. Sawall et al. 2014 PLoS ONE, Sawall et al. 2015 Scientific Reports, Wahl et al. PLoS ONE 2014.</p>

Close up of a coral sitting inside an incubation chamber of the “Coral Hotel” deployed in the Red Sea. Constructed by TLZ at GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research. Sawall et al. 2014 PLoS ONE, Sawall et al. 2015 Scientific Reports, Wahl et al. PLoS ONE 2014.

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	Sawall at the BIOS flume facility measuring reef community metabolic rates, namely photosynthesis, respiration and calcification. The flumes were built to determine light-use-efficiencies of different community types (e.g., coral, macroalgae, endolithic algae inhabiting sand) as part of the NASA <a href=COral Reef Airborne Laboratory project.

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Sawall at the BIOS flume facility measuring reef community metabolic rates, namely photosynthesis, respiration and calcification. The flumes were built to determine light-use-efficiencies of different community types (e.g., coral, macroalgae, endolithic algae inhabiting sand) as part of the NASA COral Reef Airborne Laboratory project.

Yvonne Sawall is the principle investigator of the Marine Benthic Ecology and Ecophysiology (MABEE) Laboratory at BIOS. Her research focuses on shallow water coral reefs and temperate and tropical seagrass meadows integrating aspects of physiology, ecology, and oceanography.  The overarching question of her research is how organisms and communities interact with their environment, while focusing primarily on key metabolic processes (photosynthesis, respiration and calcification) of foundation species (corals and seagrass). Understanding responses of corals and seagrass to persisting and changing environmental conditions is of paramount importance, as they form the basis of ecologically and economically important ecosystems that are exposed to increasing threat of local and global stressors. Hence, the mission of the MABEE lab is to elucidate potential impacts of global change on important coastal ecosystems by understanding the strategies and limitations of keystone organisms and benthic communities to respond to different environmental conditions.

Currently, the MABEE lab pursues three lines of research, which include
(i) organismal and community metabolism and their drivers in coral reefs,
(ii) coral thermal tolerance and thermal stress mitigation, and
(iii) seagrass functional processes and restoration

The MABEE lab applies a number of state-of-the-art and cutting-edge approaches and is particularly invested in developing and applying in-situ technologies, such as the gradient flux technique, to measure reef productivity, and a novel fully automated in-situ incubation set up (BIO-RESORT) that allows for field-based metabolic rate and flux measurements. Furthermore, multi-scale approaches are envisioned (i) to investigate how lab-derived knowledge about the effects of single or multiple environmental conditions translate into the ‘real world’ where multiple environmental parameters act on different spatial and temporal scales, and (ii) to assess what role species interactions may play in modulating the response of individuals. The MABEE lab utilizes a combination of in-situ, mesocosm, and laboratory-based approaches to investigate organismal and community processes.